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B Team
Conditioning Program

It is important to begin the season in-shape and ready to skate hard. Here is a simple dry-land conditioning program that will help you prepare for the beginning of the season. It consist of 2 different cardio workout methods, plyometrics, isometrics, and squat exercises. It's most effective if you work the program 4 days a week.

Example of a training split.

Day 1
Workout
  • 5-10 min warm-up jog in place 
  • 5-10 min stretch
  • 5-10 min isometrics
  • 6-10 min plyometrics
  • 15-30 min cardio interval
  • 5 min cool down jog in place
  • 5-10 min stretch

Day 2
Workout

  • 5-10 min warm-up jog in place 
  • 5-10 min stretch
  • 5-10 min isometrics
  • 6-10 min squats
  • 15-30 min cardio repetition
  • 5 min cool down jog in place
  • 5-10 min stretch

Day 3

Rest

Day 4
Workout

  • 5-10 min warm-up jog in place 
  • 5-10 min stretch
  • 5-10 min isometrics
  • 6-10 min plyometrics
  • 15-30 min cardio interval
  • 5 min cool down jog in place
  • 5-10 min stretch

Day 5
Workout

  • 5-10 min warm-up jog in place 
  • 5-10 min stretch
  • 5-10 min isometrics
  • 6-10 min squats
  • 15-30 min cardio repetition
  • 5 min cool down jog in place
  • 5-10 min stretch

Day 6

Rest

Day 7

Rest


 

Cardio Conditioning 
This is the most important investment in your training program because all other systems are dependent on your body's oxygen efficiency. If your cardio fails, so does everything else, i.e. strength, speed, skills. The best way to ensure good cardio conditioning for an anaerobic sport such as hockey is to incorporate repetition training and interval training. Something to avoid is steady state training , as in long runs or bike rides at a steady pace (this will slow you down on the ice for sure). Note: always warm-up thoroughly before beginning training.

Repetition Training
This cardio conditioning training involves a 1 to 3 ratio of work to rest: 1 at high intensity (work) and 3 at low intensity (rest), for a period of 15 to 30 minutes.

Any of the following exercises will do, so pick the one you like: stationary bike, elliptical, Precore cross trainer, outdoor track, running in place, stairs,  jump rope, or any other exercise that raises your heart rate.

Examples - Treadmill, 1:3 ratio

  • begin with 45 seconds of "low intensity" jog
  • switch speed to high intensity and run as fast as you can for 15 seconds "high intensity"
  • decrease speed to low intensity and jog for 45 seconds
  • switch speed to high intensity and run as fast as you can for 15 seconds "high intensity"
  • REPEAT this sequence for a minimum of 15 minutes, maximum 30

You can use shorter times such as 5-10 seconds at high intensity and 15-30 seconds at low intensity or you can use longer times such as 20-30 seconds at high intensity and 30-60 at low intensity, as long as the ratio is 1:3 of high to low.

Interval Training
This cardio conditioning training involves a 1 to 1 ratio of work to rest: 1 at medium high intensity (work) and  1 at low intensity (rest), for a period of 15 to 30 minutes.

Any of the following exercises will do, so pick the one you like: treadmill, stationary bike, elliptical, Precore cross trainer, outdoor track, running in place, stairs, or  jump rope, or any other exercise that raises your heart rate.

Examples - Treadmill, 1:1 ratio

  • begin with 1 minute of "low intensity" jog
  • switch speed to medium-high intensity and run for 1 minute at "medium-high intensity"
  • decrease speed to low intensity and jog for 1 minute
  • switch speed to medium-high intensity and run for 1 minute at "medium-high intensity"
  • REPEAT this sequence for a minimum of 15 minutes, maximum 30

You may use longer times such as 2-3 minutes at medium-high intensity and 4-6 minutes at low intensity, as long as the ratio is 1:1 of medium high to low.

 

Plyometrics
This type of training is used to develop explosive power which is critical for hockey. Plyometrics can be high impact so start off with fewer repetitions and then increase gradually as your body gets used to the demands of the exercise. A good start would be a 5 count (5 reps) followed by 5 count rest, then gradually work up to a 20 count (20 reps), followed by 20 second rest. As in all plyometrics, be sure to land softly on the balls of your feet with knees bent.

Exercise 1 - 1 leg lateral jumps
This plyometric develops the weight transfer movement for the basic stride. Jump from right foot to left foot in a lateral motion. When landing, bring your free leg close to your landing leg to simulate the return on a skating stride.

 

Exercise 2 - 2 foot squat jumps
This plyometric develops the quick action needed for skating. Begin in squat start position and jump as high as you can, land with bent knees and return to squat position. 

 

Exercise 3 - 2 foot stationary  jumps
This plyometric develops the quick action needed for skating. Begin in start position and jump as high as you can so your knees hit your hands.

 

 

Isometrics
These exercises help develop the muscle memory necessary to acquire and execute particular skills. Start out holding each position for 10-20 seconds. Repeat exercises for a period of  5 -10 minutes. 


Exercise 1 - Maximum knee bend
This isometric helps define and hold your maximum knee bend, and develops your necessary set point for a low center of gravity. Begin in an upright position and lower yourself as far as you can by bending 1 knee an hold for 10-20 seconds. All weight should be on the bent knee. Return to upright position and switch leg. 

 

Exercise 2 - Leg shoulder push
This isometric is excellent for developing leg strength and posturing for physical hockey play. Place feet shoulder width apart about 12 inches away from a stable wall and lean with your shoulder against the wall and push hard against the wall using your legs for 10-20 seconds then switch sides. The front of your body should be perpendicular to the wall.  Make sure you bend your knees and get low.

 

 

Squats
These exercises are good for strengthening quads, hams, and glutes, while increasing your range of motion. Squats can be done without weights the first few days, but you should eventually integrate dumbbell weights and increase weight gradually. You will benefit most by following the work to rest ratio as shown below:


WORK - 60 Seconds
  • 10 squats in 30 seconds
  • 10 sumo squats in 30 seconds
REST - 60 Seconds
Repeat for 6-10 minutes

 

Exercise 1 - Squat
The position for this exercise is to place feet slightly less than shoulder width apart with feet facing forward. Bend hips and knees as far as you can until your thighs are parallel to the ground.

 

 

Exercise 2 - Sumo Squat
The position for the sumo squat is to place feet wider that shoulder with apart and point feet away from the middle at a 45 degree angle. Bend hips and knees as far as you can until until your thighs are parallel to the ground. Keep your back in a more upright position as you would in a skating stance

 

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updated on 
09/15/2003